Detailed Analysis On Elephant Hills Camp Khao Sok National Park

Khao Sok’s vast terrain makes it one of the last viable habitats for large mammals. During rainy months you may spot bears, boars, gaurs, tapirs, gibbons, deer, marbled cats, wild elephants and perhaps even a tiger. And you will find over 300 bird species, 38 bat varieties and among the world’s largest flowers, the increasingly rare Rafflesia kerrii, which, in Thailand, grows only in Khao Sok. Animal-spotting aside, the best time to visit is the December & April dry season. During the June–October monsoon, paths get slippery and leeches come out in force. The upside is that the waterfalls are in full flow. If your a real adventurous type, you may go camping in the rainforest with an experienced guide who will teach you how to live in the jungle. Going by yourself or with inexperienced guides isn’t advised. When people talk about Thailand they discuss the wild nightlife, great shopping or the gorgeous beaches, but Khao Sok provides a once in a lifetime experience. Make a search on the following site, if you are looking for more details on elephant hills rainforest camp khao sok.

With views of majestic limestone cliffs and endless plains of the jungle, this awe-inspiring location is a must-see for people who love nature for all its worth and would like to have a glimpse of one of Asia’s most untouched regions. Khao Sok National Park is situated in the Phang-Nga province of southern Thailand that stretches across 739-square-kilometres, for instance, 165-square-kilometre Cheow Larn Lake, a manmade lake created by the construction of the Rachaprapha Dam back in 1982. The area is a forest sanctuary to hundreds of species of wildlife such as Gibbons, Pangolins and Asian Elephants, in addition to over 300 species of bird life. It’s surely a place to put in your Thailand itinerary if you love jungle trekking, wildlife spotting or the idea of spending a few peaceful days surrounded by nothing but nature. Bamboo holds topsoil very tenaciously, preventing soil erosion on hillsides and riverbanks. With over 1,500 species, bamboo is the oldest grass in the world, dating back nearly 60 million years. Liana trees grow rapidly wrapping around any vertical or horizontal support base like rain trees. Thus it is dangerous to just cut a tree in the jungle because it can pull connected liana vines with it creating a cascade of damage.

Buttress roots are enlarged origin bases mostly of trees which grow above the top canopy. The theory about those roots is that they either developed in order to be grounded in storms and rain or that they spread out on the floor so as to get more nutrients. Many kinds of wild fruit is found around the park and serve as sustenance for animals. Among those fruits are wild jackfruit, mangosteen, durian, rambutan, jujube, pomelo, and wild bananas. Wild pepper and ginger are not uncommon. Khao Sok National Park is perhaps most famous for the bua phut flower. To fully appreciate the tranquility of the lake, an overnight stay in a floating raft house is a must, and access is by a thrilling long-tail boat ride across the huge lake. The accommodation is rustic, but this is more than made up for by glorious lake swimming and the dawn mist rolling across the water to the whoops of gibbon calls.